Q&A

Q&A with Uma Katju

A working, experienced actor from New Delhi, Uma enjoys the challenges of traversing different theatre and performance forms, and is especially drawn to mask-work, realism and the traditional arts. Her study in mask began in 2013 through training in clowning under Reinhardt Horskotte and Michael Moritz. A classically trained singer, Uma hopes to explore the theatricality of music in the future. In Singapore,  she has performed in Chowk’s Pallavi and Space (2016), and co-created and performed The Moonlit Smile at the Esplanade Moonfest (2016).

Uma holds a research degree in Political Science from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.  
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Q&A with Desmond Soh Jin Kai

First captured by the power of theatre in River Valley High where he was a student, Desmond went on eventually head the school’s Chinese Language Drama and Debate Society (CLDDS), participating in numerous performances.

From that start, Desmond deepened the drama connection as part of Drama Box’s youth wing, ARTivate, where he is a graduate of its second cohort in 2014. He has also served as the director’s assistant (movement) for Kopitiam (2016), a programme of the Esplanade’s “Feed Your Imagination” series.

After he graduates from ITI, Desmond plans to continue his work in acting, exploring theatrical structures and how they can create spaces for conversations in the community.

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Q&A with Teo Dawn

Like many Singaporean students, Teo Dawn found herself questioning her next steps after the completion of her junior college education. But instead of moving from one school to another after six years in Dunman High School’s IP programme, Dawn decided to take the time to deliberate. In a two-year break from the pursuit of education, Dawn worked on theatre productions, such as with Buds Theatre Company, contributed editorially to online platforms, gained some real-life experience with internships, before deciding to join ITI in 2015.

“I had read of ITI when The Straits Times wrote about the reboot of the programme [in 2011], and took interest. Subsequently, I did my own research about the training and really wanted to learn more about the traditional forms together with the contemporary. I think the rigour and the disciplines really attracted me,” Dawn recalls of her journey to her three-year professional theatre training, “but what sealed the deal was watching Cloud Messenger [in 2014] devised and performed by the graduating cohort of ITI students that year. The stories of sincerity and human spirit really touched me; I want to be able to do that with storytelling.”

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Q & A (Part II) with Denise Mordeno Aguilar

Denise graduated from ITI in 2014 and has been busy since her return to her home country, Philippines. ITI spoke with Denise last, then on the eve of her graduation, to ask of her thoughts of her three years training journey. In this short 1.5 years since, Denise has been active teaching, performing and directing in Manila, Dumaguete, Ozamiz city and in her hometown of Cagayan de Oro. Denise has always believed in the arts as a powerful way to share stories that reflect the complexities of society, and of using theatre as a creative pathway to peace and community engagement – directions she has pursued and are fulfilling even right now. Recently honoured with the inaugural Lambago Art Awards presented by Xavier Center for Culture and the Arts, Denise reflects on how ITI remains a part of her practice today.


What highlights have there been for you since you graduated?

After I graduated from ITI, I was busy preparing and rehearsing my 45-minute solo piece Hope Floats which took root from my Final-Year Individual Presentation back at ITI. I didn’t quite know where to get started right after graduation, but I had, thankfully, signed up early for the inaugural Fringe Manila Festival so I got a chance to perform this solo work in February to March 2015 at De La Salle University in Pasay, Metro Manila. When I went back to my hometown, I was invited to perform Hope Floats on World Theatre Day (March 27, 2015) at Xavier University in Cagayan de Oro City. All Hope Floats performances were by donations only, with all proceeds turned over to my former classmate and friend who is fighting end-stage renal disease. Continue reading

“Simplicity” Q&A with Guillermo Angelelli

Actor, director and teacher, Guillermo Angelelli studied drama at the National School of Dramatic Arts in Buenos Aires (Argentina) and continued his training with teachers such as Carlos Gandolfo and Cristina Moreira.

He was one of the founders of Clu del Claun, a pioneering group that defied tradition in the 1980s and gained legendary status in Buenos Aires. In 1986, he began to develop training and research work with Iben Nagel Rassmusen of Denmark’s Odin Teatret, and is now a member of the Vindenes Bro Group (The Bridge of Winds) managed by Rassmusen.

Guillermo has been teaching since 1986 in drama institutions and at workshops, focusing on clowning, physical and vocal training in Argentina and other parts of Latin America, as well as Europe.

He has won many awards for his work in theatre including the Harlequin Award for Best Actor and Director for Asterion (1992), GATEA Award and Maria Guerrero Award for Best Actor for The Threepenny Opera (2004) and Hamlet (2004), and Maria Guerrero Award for Best Actor in Woyzeck (2006).

This March, he directs and co-creates Simplicity together with our graduating class. Inspired by the eponymous poem written by Jorge Luis Borges, Simplicity plays at the Drama Centre from 17 – 19 March 2016.

For more information, visit simplicity.peatix.com


Q: What were your motivations for choosing “Simplicity” – the poem – as the start point of this play? Continue reading

Q&A with Al-Matin Yatim

Singaporean Al-Matin Yatim first began his craft as an actor in 2007 when he joined Temasek Polytechnic’s then Malay theatre society, Titisan Temasek. Since then, he has worked with theatre and dance companies such as the National University of Singapore Malay dance group, PanggungArts, People’s Association, Teater Artistik, Teater Kami, TheatreLab, Cake Theatrical Productions and Chowk. He has also worked on collaborative works with Esplanade and Read! Festival by the National Library Board.

After he completes his three-year training at ITI, Matin hopes to share the idea of intercultural theatre on an international level and contribute back to society.

Matin was a recipient of the NAC-ITI Arts Scholarship (2013 – 2015).


Q: What is it like to study here in ITI?

I remember when I was in my first year, I told Sasi, Director of ITI, that being in ITI is tougher than my two years in National Service. Not because of its regimental nature, in fact ITI is far from it, but the demand that the training requires from the student physically, psychologically, spiritually, emotionally and intellectually. Continue reading

Q&A with Beto Ruiz

Beto (a.k.a. Alberto Ruiz Lopez) was a 2008 graduate of Intercultural Theatre Institute (ITI), then known as Theatre Training and Research Programme (TTRP). Prior to his training here, Beto had earned a Bachelors of Performing Arts from the University of Guadalajara, Mexico.

A theatre practitioner who has directed and acted, he was also a former Director of the Company of Theatre from Jalisco. Beto has performed in productions such as The Divine Wind And Tears Lost In The Rain, Attempts On Her Life and Kuo Pao Kun’s The Spirits Play. In 2015, Beto performed in R vs J, a solo piece in Mexico.

As a director, he has helmed operas – Verdi’s La Traviata and Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas – and plays such as Dario Fo’s Un Dia Cualquiera and Alfred Jarry’s King Ubu. His work extends beyond his home country of Mexico to Poland; Texas, USA; and Colombia.

This year, the ITI alumnus returns full circle as an Acting and Movement teacher to the institute.


Q: After earning your Professional Diploma here at ITI (TTRP then) in 2008, what did you think were your next steps from there? Continue reading

Q&A with Chang Ting Wei

Chang Ting Wei hails from Taichung, Taiwan.

Ting Wei graduated from the University of East London with a Master’s Degree in Acting (2011) and also holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Applied Theater and Creative Drama from the National University of Tainan.

In her postgraduate study years, Ting Wei had performed with Half Moon Theatre and Stratford Theatres in London, and also played Natasha in Chekhov’s Three Sisters. She was involved in many arts festivals in Taiwan, including hosting the Nan Ying Art Festival.

Ting Wei’s involvement in the traditional arts has seen her perform with Ming Hwa Yuan Taiwanese Opera Company in the play Sui Tang Yan Yi.

In Singapore, she has collaborated with Drama Box, playing a lead role in a forum theatre piece Just A Bad Day (2013). As part of the Esplanade’s 2014 Huayi Festival, Ting Wei has also performed in Moving Horizon: A Nanyin Journey presentation, and with Cake Theatre in Decimal Points 810 (2014).


Q: What is it like to study here at ITI?

It is a unique experience: it is, firstly, difficult but good training to expand one’s techniques and stamina, and secondly, an uncomfortable but effective way to learn how to embrace different cultures and personalities. Training together for 10 hours a day, five times a week in a fixed studio area means personal space and sometimes ego, too, have to be adjusted under these circumstances. In short, it’s a constant and intense battle between yourself and your surroundings. I belief, what marks ITI as a unique institution is the intercultural concept. How we perceive the word ‘intercultural’ becomes the most complex question in the three years of training here – and there is no set, right or wrong answer. Therefore, as an artist- student, how one tackles the path to navigate through these learnings is the most arduous but rewarding journey. Continue reading

Q&A with Yazid Jalil

Yazid’s professional theatre experience began long before joining Intercultural Theatre Institute. An alumnus of Singapore Repertory Theatre’s youth wing, the SRT Young Company, Yazid had also worked as an actor with Singapore theatre companies such as Teater Ekamatra, BUDS Theatre Company, Cake Theatrical Productions, Agni Koothu, We Colour People Theatre Company and Yellow Chair Productions.

Yazid was nominated Best Supporting Actor at the 11th Life! Theatre Awards (2011) for his role in Teater Ekamatra’s production of Charged. He also has a Best Performance nomination at the 3rd Singapore Short Film Awards (2012) for his leading role in Love In Any Genre. More recent is his and fellow co-actors’ nomination in the 13th Life! Theatre Awards (2013) for Best Ensemble for Pretty Things (Pat Toh/Substation). Yazid was last seen in The Malay Man and His Chinese Father, a physical theatre piece that is part of the M1 Singapore Fringe Festival 2015.

In 2011, Yazid pursued theatre training in France at the Ecole Philippe Gaulier as an awardee of the Singapore National Arts Council Residency Programme. Yazid also holds a diploma in Communications and Media Management from Temasek Polytechnic, where he specialised in English journalism. Yazid is a recipient of the NAC-ITI Arts Scholarship and has a scholarship from the Tan Chay Bing Education Fund.


Q: What is it like to study here in ITI?

It’s like being in an inter-galactic Star Wars cantina. There are so many different things to taste and look at – interesting things but not necessarily all pleasant. What I mean is: training is hard; but it has always been my belief that if it’s easy, you’re not learning anything new. So, in the end, all is good. Actually, I applied to ITI knowing how difficult the training would be, prepared myself for it and still found that it was difficult. So a word to future applicants: if you think you know what you’re getting into, think again! Continue reading

Q&A with Andy Ng

Andy Ng, a Hong Kong citizen, graduated from Theatre Training & Research Practice (TTRP; ITI’s former name) in 2003, as a member of the pioneer cohort.

He has created works such as Whisper of Love presented by Unlock Dancing Plaza in Hong Kong and Ending the World commissioned by the Hong Kong Arts Festival 2006. In the latter, Andy directed and performed alongside ITI graduates Melissa Leung and Walter Leung.

In 2009, he performed in the inaugural The Spirits Play presented by TETC – a theatre collective established by ITI alumni. The Spirits Play went on to play at the 12th Bharat Rang Mahotsav – a major theatre festival in India – after opening in Singapore.

He was in the ensemble cast of Tang Shu-wing’s Titus Andronicus 2.0, presented at Esplanade’s Huayi Festival 2011, which then toured through Taipei, Beijing and Europe, prior to being invited to the 2012 World Shakespeare Festival at the Globe Theatre in London.

Today, Andy lectures on movement at the Drama School, Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts, and has undertaken an action-research project on Taichi and acting.

Most recently, in January 2015, Andy stars in director Adrien Leung’s cinematic theatre production, Landscape of Ozu, inspired by the late Japanese film-maker Yasujiro Ozu, playing in Hong Kong. Continue reading